MYTH vs. FACT: COVID-19 vaccines

Monday, March 29, 2021

Pen writing myths and facts on paper.

Now that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has authorized three vaccines for COVID-19, let’s review some common myths and clear up any confusion with reliable facts. 

MYTH: The vaccines were rushed and not safe. 
FACT: Although the vaccines were developed at a rapid pace, they were rigorously tested for safety and effectiveness. The FDA made sure that they were safe. Many years of research laid the foundation for these vaccines. Testing showed Moderna, Pfizer, and Johnson & Johnson vaccines are safe and prevent severe illness, hospitalizations, and deaths.
 
MYTH: Getting the COVID-19 vaccine gives you COVID-19. 
FACT: The vaccines cannot and will not give you the virus. Instead, it prepares your immune system to recognize and fight the infection. Medical experts say that side effects are a result of your immune system responding. Your state’s Department of Health website is a great resource for further vaccine information and rollout plans. 

MYTH: The vaccine causes severe side effects and adverse reactions.
FACT: The COVID-19 vaccines can cause mild side effects. Some people may have soreness in their arm, fever or tiredness. This is normal and is a sign that the body is building immunity to protect you from the virus. The CDC says side effects may feel like the flu. To learn more, visit the CDC’s website

MYTH: We don’t know what is in the vaccines. 

FACT: Some conspiracies say the vaccines contain a tracking microchip. There is no truth to that. In reality, all three vaccines have 10 or less ingredients, which are commonly found in medications and vaccines you’ve seen before. The vaccines work by preparing your immune system to fight off an infection if you come in contact with the virus.  

COVID-19 vaccines are covered at 100% under the TeamCare Wellness Benefit. For guidance about your individual health concerns related to the COVID-19 vaccines, please reach out to your primary care physician.

 

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